Types of Hair: How to Style and Care for Your Hair Type

Hey TKN Beauties,

Before anything else, let me say. YOUR HAIR IS BEAUTIFUL! Never mind what they say.

Whether fine, thick, long, short, glossy, curly, coily, or straight, your hair deserves respect. Get to know your hair’s curl patterns, porosity, density, and styling needs because healthy self-care includes your hair.

 

Type 1: Straight

Type 1 hair has no natural curl. The individual strands may be fine or coarse, thick or thin, but they fall without waving from root to tip.

Type 1 hair has a tendency to become oily, so many stylists recommend that you check the label to be sure the product you’re buying isn’t going to add extra oil to your hair.

Washing your hair too often can cause your scalp to overproduce oils, so dry shampoo is a boon for people with straight, oily hair.

 

Type 2: Wavy hair

Type 2A

The natural state of type 2 hair is a gentle, tousled texture. From the roots to around eye level, your hair is fairly straight. And from eye level to the ends, you have a loose, undefined wave.

To keep from flattening out that wave, steer clear of oil-based or creamy products. Instead, stylists recommend that you boost the base with a light mousse or use a gel to define those waves.

 

Type 2B

As with 2A, type 2B hair curls from the midpoint to the ends. The curls have a more defined S shape. It may require a little more effort to straighten, but it’s easy to create that beachy look with a spritz of salt spray.

Type 2B is ideal for the balayage trend, where stylists hand-paint color on the outer layer of hair.

Type 2C

The most well-defined S-shaped waves are type 2C. The wave pattern may begin close to the crown and tumble downward. Type 2C hair is often thick and can be prone to frizz in damp weather.

We recommend using a diffuser, a toothy devise that snaps onto the end of your blow dryer and helps eliminate the frizz.

People with 2C hair may be frustrated with alternating between daily straightening, which can damage hair, and trying to find ways to enhance and control their waves. The good news is that many lightweight mousses now contain anti-humidity ingredients along with moisture.

Type 3: Curly

Type 3A

With type 3A hair, S-shaped curls form loose loops. The curls have a circumference a little wider than the large end of a taper candle. One important styling note: Brushing this type of hair can wreck curl definition and lead to a frizzy mane.

 

That hair loss happens because the weight of the ponytail pulls against the front of the hair for prolonged periods.

Type 3B

Type 3B curls have a circumference about as wide as the barrel of a Sharpie marker. Curls spring from the roots and have ample volume. To maintain their characteristic spiral shape, these ringlets generally need moisture.

Avoid silicone and sulfates in your curl products, though. They may temporarily tame frizz, but they can dry hair over time and lead to breakage.

Type 3C

These curls are tight and springy — they would coil perfectly around a drinking straw. To preserve the definition in these corkscrew curls, take a hands-on approach.

Instead of combing, which can lead to frizz and breakage, use a leave-in conditioner and rake through wet hair with your fingertips. The American Academy of Dermatology recommends that you air-dry instead of using a blow dryer.

Type 4: Coils

Type 4A

The curl pattern for 4A hair is an S-shaped coil you could wrap around a chopstick.  Type 4 hair is the most delicate hair type, You have to be very gentle with it, and it needs a lot of moisture. We recommend that people wear it loose in wash-and-go styles.

Though some stylists swear by styles that allow you to tuck away fragile ends to protect them while they grow out, these styles often do more harm than good. While the hair is out of sight, it’s also out of reach for conditioning treatments.

Better to wear it in a style that lets you keep moisturizing.

Type 4B

The curls in 4B hair zig-zag. One popular technique for defining and accentuating your curls is shingling.

Shingling begins with wet hair. Gently detangle with your fingertips, using liberal amounts of leave-in conditioner to moisturize and condition. Then separate your hair into four sections.

Work curling cream or gel down the length of each curl, twisting the strands around your index finger as you go.

Type 4C

Type 4C coils are the tightest and most fragile. It’s really easy to break them if you comb roughly or too often, and it’s vital to frequently nourish the hair with rich conditioners.

Coconut oils are still popular, as are shea butter creams. More people are ditching shampoo for co-washing, or rinsing the hair with conditioners instead.

In terms of style, 4C hair is having a moment. 

 

Nora Hair Products is organically & professionally made for all types of hair. It contains proteins, antioxidants, and antimicrobial agents that will contribute to healthy hair. It has antifungal and antiviral properties, which prevent dandruff and other fungal infections and improve scalp health. Improve blood circulation which helps with hair growth, dry flaky itch scalp, and has anti- inflammatory properties. Check out the products

 

Wherever you are on your hair journey, others have probably been there before, too.

One of the most helpful things you can do is use social media to find and follow someone whose hair type is similar to yours, follow on our socials: Instagram @norahairproducts and in our Facebook for more exclusive updates! Try products they recommend. Use techniques that worked for them. You’ll save time and money and find a supportive community, Join The Healthy Hair Tribe today! 

 

Conclusion

Hair type is all about your hair’s curl pattern. Type 1 hair is straight. Type 2 is best described as wavy. Type 3 hair is curly, and type 4 is coily. You may have different curl patterns on different parts of your head.

To keep curls healthy, bouncy, and defined, you’ll need to experiment with products to find the ones that work best for your hair. The curlier and more porous your hair is, the more likely you are to need intense, regular moisturizing to keep it healthy.

If you’re not sure where to start, consult a professional who specializes in your type of hair, or follow someone with your hair type on social media, follow @thekenyattanicole.

 

You may consult Kenyatta Nicole for your hair concerns. Click here to book your appointment with her. 

 

If you need more hair care tips or just have a question, contact us. We’d love to help you figure out how to get that healthy, shiny, damage-free hair that you want. In the meantime, keep reading our blogs.

Do you have a blog topic in mind? Do you have some burning hair care questions? Let us know here and we can try to accommodate your request!